It Takes Unity

It Takes Unity

Stories from Members of the Southern Appalachian Mountain Stewards

There’s a reason why people do things, there’s a reason why people organize their communities. These are the stories of a few members of the Southern Appalachian Mountain Stewards, the stories of what got them involved with fighting back against the coal companies that most of them worked for, the stories of their relationship to the mountains, and the things that they envision for their communities.

Click the link here for the PDF version of It Takes Unity, or read the stories by clicking on the links below. We are planning a follow up to It Takes Unity, so we’d love your feedback on this project.

Sam Broach, “third generation deep-miner, president of SAMS.”

Judi Clark, “lifetime resident of the area, board member of SAMS, resident of Big Stone Gap, VA”

Larry Bush, “SAMS member, former Union deep miner and mine inspector, avid outdoorsmen”

Judy Needham, “board member of SAMS, resident of Andover, VA.”

Mike Clark, “board member of SAMS, resident of Big Stone Gap, VA”

Bob Mullins, “third generation deep-miner, member of SAMS, former Union miner.”

Tug Smith, “resident of Exeter, VA”

Thank you to our funders:

The Southern Appalachian Mountain Stewards

The Heartwood Council

Appalachian Voices

We’d like to thank Emily Currier, who collected and edited these interviews to create this publication. We’d also like to thank Patrick St. John for volunteering his time to lay out the pamphlet version of It Takes Unity. And lastly and most importantly, we’d like to thank the members of The Southern Appalachian Mountain Stewards for lending their time, and sharing their stories.

If you’re interested in sharing your story, becoming a SAMS member, or receiving information about future events, visit samva.org or call 276-523-4380 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting              276-523-4380      end_of_the_skype_highlighting.

Leave a Reply

RReNEW Photos

			Rrenew Collective posted a photo:	What some of the mountains in Northern Wise County actually look like. Missing their tops.			Rrenew Collective posted a photo:	Sitting on top of Black Mountain, looking out over Ison Rock Ridge, 9 Mile Spur, the town of Appalachia, and Stone Mountain there in the distance. That is Looney Ridge in the fore ground, topless, eroding, in the process of a slow decapitation			Rrenew Collective posted a photo:				Rrenew Collective posted a photo: